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Tracking mobile usability in Webmaster Tools

Google Webmaster Central Blog - Wed, 2014-10-29 06:43

Webmaster Level: intermediate

Mobile is growing at a fantastic pace - in usage, not just in screen size. To keep you informed of issues mobile users might be seeing across your website, we've added the Mobile Usability feature to Webmaster Tools.

The new feature shows mobile usability issues we’ve identified across your website, complete with graphs over time so that you see the progress that you've made.

A mobile-friendly site is one that you can easily read & use on a smartphone, by only having to scroll up or down. Swiping left/right to search for content, zooming to read text and use UI elements, or not being able to see the content at all make a site harder to use for users on mobile phones. To help, the Mobile Usability reports show the following issues: Flash content, missing viewport (a critical meta-tag for mobile pages), tiny fonts, fixed-width viewports, content not sized to viewport, and clickable links/buttons too close to each other.

We strongly recommend you take a look at these issues in Webmaster Tools, and think about how they might be resolved; sometimes it's just a matter of tweaking your site's template! More information on how to make a great mobile-friendly website can be found in our Web Fundamentals website (with more information to come soon).

If you have any questions, feel free to join us in our webmaster help forums (on your phone too)!

Posted by John Mueller, Webmaster Trends Analyst, Zurich
Categories: sysadmin

Whoa, back up a little CommVault: ANOTHER weak quarter?

The Register - Wed, 2014-10-29 06:43
Hammer head promises improvements

CommVault has reported a depressing set of results as sales headcount and mid-market product and pricing strategy faux pas cause a stumble – another stumble, in fact, as first quarter results were poor too.…

Categories: news

IBM, backing away from hardware? NEVER!

The Register - Wed, 2014-10-29 06:21
Don't be so sure, so-surers

HPC Blog So, it looks like IBM has moved its chipworks over to Globalfoundries, as described by Reg hack Tim Worstall here. But what are the implications for IBM's systems business?…

Categories: news

Samsung wants a bite of flash cache, will eat Proximal Data – sources

The Register - Wed, 2014-10-29 06:02
AutoCache provider will slot nicely into Korea Co's offerings

Samsung is buying Proximal Data, a flash caching software company, people close to the situation told The Register, although no formal announcement has been made.…

Categories: news

SwiftStack Bags $16 Million to Fund OpenStack Cloud Storage

Linux Today - Wed, 2014-10-29 06:00

Datamation: As cloud computing gains adoption, so too does the need for storage.

Categories: linux, news, open source

Singapore upholds law that criminalizes gay sex

Reuters: Technology - Wed, 2014-10-29 05:56
SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Singapore's highest court ruled on Wednesday that a law that criminalizes sex between men is in line with the city-state's constitution, rejecting two separate appeals by three men that the measure infringed their human rights.
Categories: news

Apple spent just ONE DOLLAR beefing up the latest iPad Air 2

The Register - Wed, 2014-10-29 05:27
New iPads look a lot like the old one. There's a reason for that

New iPad Air 2 components cost Apple just one dollar more than the previous model, according to the teardown bods at IHS.…

Categories: news

Updating our technical Webmaster Guidelines

Google Webmaster Central Blog - Wed, 2014-10-29 05:23

Webmaster level: All

We recently announced that our indexing system has been rendering web pages more like a typical modern browser, with CSS and JavaScript turned on. Today, we're updating one of our technical Webmaster Guidelines in light of this announcement.

For optimal rendering and indexing, our new guideline specifies that you should allow Googlebot access to the JavaScript, CSS, and image files that your pages use. This provides you optimal rendering and indexing for your site. Disallowing crawling of Javascript or CSS files in your site’s robots.txt directly harms how well our algorithms render and index your content and can result in suboptimal rankings.

Updated advice for optimal indexing

Historically, Google indexing systems resembled old text-only browsers, such as Lynx, and that’s what our Webmaster Guidelines said. Now, with indexing based on page rendering, it's no longer accurate to see our indexing systems as a text-only browser. Instead, a more accurate approximation is a modern web browser. With that new perspective, keep the following in mind:

  • Just like modern browsers, our rendering engine might not support all of the technologies a page uses. Make sure your web design adheres to the principles of progressive enhancement as this helps our systems (and a wider range of browsers) see usable content and basic functionality when certain web design features are not yet supported.
  • Pages that render quickly not only help users get to your content easier, but make indexing of those pages more efficient too. We advise you follow the best practices for page performance optimization, specifically:
  • Make sure your server can handle the additional load for serving of JavaScript and CSS files to Googlebot.
Testing and troubleshooting

In conjunction with the launch of our rendering-based indexing, we also updated the Fetch and Render as Google feature in Webmaster Tools so webmasters could see how our systems render the page. With it, you'll be able to identify a number of indexing issues: improper robots.txt restrictions, redirects that Googlebot cannot follow, and more.

And, as always, if you have any comments or questions, please ask in our Webmaster Help forum.

Posted by Pierre Far, Webmaster Trends Analyst
Categories: sysadmin

Inside the EYE of the TORnado: From Navy spooks to Silk Road

The Register - Wed, 2014-10-29 05:03
It's hard enough to peel the onion, are you hard enough to eat the core?

Comment TOR is the most widely used system for the provision of anonymity for internet users. I'll look at how TOR came about: its beginnings in the US Navy; growth and use by both pro-democracy freedom fighters and the less savoury elements of the internet; and how the NSA may have managed to peel the onion router for the FBI to help it collar its suspects.…

Categories: news

IT JOB OUTSOURCING: Will it ever END?

The Register - Wed, 2014-10-29 04:33
Let's look at the economics behind it...

Worstall on Wednesday HL Mencken once told us that in a democracy the electorate should get what they voted for – and good and hard too. So, on that basis, I present to you a piece on outsourcing, as requested by one Gordon 10.…

Categories: news

BYOD: Why the biggest security worry is the fool within rather than the enemy without

LinuxSecurity.com - Wed, 2014-10-29 04:20
LinuxSecurity.com: The vast majority - 95 percent - of IT managers are prepared to admit that they are struggling to tackle all the potential security threats they face and 87 percent believe that the biggest threats came from mobile devices in the hands of careless employees, according to a new survey.
Categories: linux, news, security

Hackers target unclassified White House network

LinuxSecurity.com - Wed, 2014-10-29 04:19
LinuxSecurity.com: Hackers targeted an unclassified White House network but did not damage any systems, a White House official said Tuesday.
Categories: linux, news, security

Getting Lost In the Scientific Woods Is Good For You

Slashdot - Wed, 2014-10-29 04:18
StartsWithABang writes: Wandering into the woods unprepared and without a plan sounds like a terrible idea. But if you're interested in scientific exploration at the frontiers, confronting the unknown with whatever you happen to have at your disposal, you have to take that risk. You have to be willing to take those steps. And you have to be okay with putting your best ideas out there — for all to see — knowing full well that you might get the entire thing wrong. Sometimes, that's indeed what happens. Some of the most revered and famous scientific minds in history confronted the great mysteries of nature, and came away having done nothing but set us back many years by leading the field down a blind alley. But other times, the greatest leaps forward in our understanding occur as a result. The article shares some notable examples, and explains why this is vital for scientific progress.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Hackers Are Using Gmail Drafts to Update Their Malware and Steal Data

LinuxSecurity.com - Wed, 2014-10-29 04:15
LinuxSecurity.com: In his career-ending extramarital affair that came to light in 2012, General David Petraeus used a stealthy technique to communicate with his lover Paula Broadwell: the pair left messages for each other in the drafts folder of a shared Gmail account. Now hackers have learned the same trick. Only instead of a mistress, they're sharing their love letters with data-stealing malware buried deep on a victim's computer.
Categories: linux, news, security

Apple to PROTECT YOU from dreaded TROUSER EXPLOSIONS

The Register - Wed, 2014-10-29 04:01
Pantleg conflag safety at last

Apple has patented a fireproof material that could finally banish the misery of mobile phone trouser explosions.…

Categories: news

Google may hook Kubernetes deep into own cloud

The Register - Wed, 2014-10-29 03:33
'Highly differentiated experience' promised, details likely at November gabfest

Google's Cloud Platform Live event in the USA next week may offer up some news on how The Chocolate Factory will allow developers to put Kubernetes to work in its own cloud.…

Categories: news

BlackEnergy crimeware coursing through US control systems

The Register - Wed, 2014-10-29 03:01
US CERT says three flavours of control kit are under attack

Industrial control systems in the United States have been compromised by the BlackEnergy malware toolkit for at least three years in a campaign the US Computer Emergency Response Team has dubbed "ongoing" and sophisticated.…

Categories: news

16-Teraflops, £97m Cray To Replace IBM At UK Meteorological Office

Slashdot - Wed, 2014-10-29 02:37
Memetic writes: The UK weather forecasting service is replacing its IBM supercomputer with a Cray XC40 containing 17 petabytes of storage and capable of 16 TeraFLOPS. This is Cray's biggest contract outside the U.S. With 480,000 CPUs, it should be 13 times faster than the current system. It will weigh 140 tons. The aim is to enable more accurate modeling of the unstable UK climate, with UK-wide forecasts at a resolution of 1.5km run hourly, rather than every three hours, as currently happens. (Here's a similar system from the U.S.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

16-Teraflops, £97m Cray To Replace IBM At UK Meteorological Office

Slashdot - Wed, 2014-10-29 02:37
Memetic writes: The UK weather forecasting service is replacing its IBM supercomputer with a Cray XC40 containing 17 petabytes of storage and capable of 16 TeraFLOPS. This is Cray's biggest contract outside the U.S. With 480,000 CPUs, it should be 13 times faster than the current system. It will weigh 140 tons. The aim is to enable more accurate modeling of the unstable UK climate, with UK-wide forecasts at a resolution of 1.5km run hourly, rather than every three hours, as currently happens. (Here's a similar system from the U.S.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

16-Teraflops, £97m Cray To Replace IBM At UK Meteorological Office

Slashdot - Wed, 2014-10-29 02:37
Memetic writes: The UK weather forecasting service is replacing its IBM supercomputer with a Cray XC40 containing 17 petabytes of storage and capable of 16 TeraFLOPS. This is Cray's biggest contract outside the U.S. With 480,000 CPUs, it should be 13 times faster than the current system. It will weigh 140 tons. The aim is to enable more accurate modeling of the unstable UK climate, with UK-wide forecasts at a resolution of 1.5km run hourly, rather than every three hours, as currently happens. (Here's a similar system from the U.S.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news