news aggregator

Obama to meet with UK's Prince William at White House

Reuters: Technology - Fri, 2014-12-05 15:32
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Britain's Prince William will meet with President Barack Obama in the Oval Office on Monday, part of a visit to Washington to a conference on illegal trafficking of ivory and other wildlife, the White House said.






Categories: news

U.S.-led forces conduct 20 air strikes against Islamic State

Reuters: Technology - Fri, 2014-12-05 15:25
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States and partner nations have conducted 20 air strikes against Islamic State targets in Syria and Iraq since Wednesday, the U.S. Central Command said on Friday.
Categories: news

In North Korea, Hackers Are a Handpicked, Pampered Elite

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-12-05 15:18
HughPickens.com writes: Ju-Min Park and James Pearson report at Reuters that despite its poverty and isolation, North Korea has poured resources into a sophisticated cyber-warfare cell called Bureau 121, staffed by some of the most talented, and rewarded, people in North Korea, handpicked and trained from as young as 17. "They are handpicked," says Kim Heung-kwang, a former computer science professor in North Korea who defected to the South in 2004. "It is a great honor for them. It is a white-collar job there and people have fantasies about it." The hackers in Bureau 121 were among the 100 students who graduate from the University of Automation each year after five years of study. Over 2,500 apply for places at the university, which has a campus in Pyongyang, behind barbed wire. According to Jang Se-yul, who studied with them at North Korea's military college for computer science, the Bureau 121 unit comprises about 1,800 cyber-warriors, and is considered the elite of the military. As well as having salaries far above the country's average, they are often gifted with good food, luxuries and even apartments. According to John Griasafi, this kind of treatment could be expected for those working in the elite Bureau. "You'd have to be pretty special and well trusted to even be allowed on email in North Korea so I have no doubt that they are treated well too." Pyongyang has active cyber-warfare capabilities, military and software security experts have said. In 2013, tens of thousands of computers were made to malfunction, disrupting work at banks and television broadcasters in South Korea. "In North Korea, it's called the Secret War," says Jang.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Brewing machine hops to it with Linux

Linux Today - Fri, 2014-12-05 15:00

 LinuxGizmos: At Indiegogo there's a Linux-based automated beer brewing machine called the Brewie, with 20-liter capacity, plus touchscreen, RFID, and mobile app access.

Categories: linux, news, open source

Microsoft Introduces </nobr>.NET Core

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-12-05 14:58
New submitter I will be back writes: Microsoft's Immo Landwerth has provided more details on the open source .NET Core. Taking a page from the Mono cookbook, .NET Core was built to be modular with unified Base Class Library (BCL), so you can install only the necessary packages for Core and ship it with applications using NuGet. Thus, NuGet becomes a first-class citizen and the default tool to deliver .NET Core packages. As a smaller and cross-platform subset of the .NET Framework, it will have its own update schedule, updating multiple times a year, while .NET will be updated once a year. At the release of .NET 4.6, Core will be a clear subset of the .NET Framework. With future iterations it will be ahead of the .NET Framework. "The .NET Core platform is a new .NET stack that is optimized for open source development and agile delivery on NuGet. We're working with the Mono community to make it great on Windows, Linux and Mac, and Microsoft will support it on all three platforms."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Trains May Soon Come Equipped With Debris-Zapping Lasers

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-12-05 14:36
Molly McHugh writes: Holland's chief transportation service is testing a unique new way to clear the rails of fallen leaves and other small debris: by mounting lasers on the fronts of locomotives. The lasers will cause the leaves, which produce a condition commonly referred to as "slippery rail" in the fall and winter months, to vanish in a puff of smoke.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Acquia Shields Drupal Users

Linux Today - Fri, 2014-12-05 14:00

eWEEK: A new security service provides additional protection for users of the cloud-hosted version of the Drupal content management system.

Categories: linux, news, open source

Why Apple, Google, and FB Have Their Own Programming Languages

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-12-05 13:54
An anonymous reader writes: Scott Rosenberg, author of Dreaming in Code dissects Apple's Swift, Google's Go, and other new languages — why they were created, what makes them different, and what they bring (or not) to programmers. "In very specific ways, both Go and Swift exemplify and embody the essences of the companies that built them: the server farm vs. the personal device; the open Web vs. the App Store; a cross-platform world vs. a company town. Of all the divides that distinguish programming languages—compiled or interpreted? static vs. dynamic variable typing? memory-managed/garbage-collected or not?—these might be the ones that matter most today."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

China arrests ex-security chief for corruption, leaking secrets

Reuters: Technology - Fri, 2014-12-05 13:34
BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese authorities have arrested former domestic security chief Zhou Yongkang and expelled him from the ruling Communist Party, accusing him of crimes ranging from accepting bribes to leaking state secrets and setting the stage for his trial.
Categories: news

Ask Slashdot: Dealing With Electronics-Induced Inattentiveness?

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-12-05 13:10
An anonymous reader writes: I am a graduate student in his twenties who used to be able to read dozens and dozens of lengthy books in his childhood. Over the years, I have noticed that my attention span and ability to concentrate has decreased noticeably, seemingly in synchronization with society's increased connectedness with the Internet and constant stimulation from computers and mobile devices alike. I have noticed that myself and others seem to have a difficult time really sitting down to read anything or focus on anything relatively boring for even more than ten seconds (the "TL;DR Generation," as I sometimes call it). I see it when socializing with others or even during a professor's lecture. I have tried leaving my mobile phone at home and limiting myself to fewer browser tabs in an effort to regain concentration that I believe has been lost in recent years. Nonetheless, this is an issue that has begun to adversely affect my academic studies and may only get worse in time. What advice do fellow Slashdot users have with regard to reclaiming what has been lost? Should such behaviors simply be accepted as a sign of the times?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Selling a Non-Product: The Multifaceted OpenStack

Linux Today - Fri, 2014-12-05 13:00

LinuxInsider: Is OpenStack best deployed as a server distribution, a service from a cloud provider, or something else?

Categories: linux, news, open source

Google? Microsoft? What the heck do they do in cloud?

The Register - Fri, 2014-12-05 12:30
AWS: None of the 46 cloudy price cuts a response to rivals. Honest!

Amazon Web Services has gouged prices of 46 services since its launch in 2006, but not one was in retaliation to rivals (no way, not one), insists UK boss Iain Gavin.…

Categories: news

DOJ Launches New Cybercrime Unit, Claims Privacy Top Priority

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-12-05 12:26
msm1267 writes: Leslie Caldwell, assistant attorney general in the criminal division of the Department of Justice, announced on Thursday the creation of a new Cybercrime Unit, tasked with enhancing public-private security efforts. A large part of the Cybersecurity Unit's mission will be to quell the growing distrust many Americans have toward law enforcement's high-tech investigative techniques. (Even if that lack of trust, as Caldwell claimed, is based largely on misinformation about the technical abilities of the law enforcement tools and the manners in which they are used.) "In fact, almost every decision we make during an investigation requires us to weigh the effect on privacy and civil liberties, and we take that responsibility seriously," Caldwell said. "Privacy concerns are not just tacked onto our investigations, they are baked in."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

New NASA spaceship successfully completes debut test run

Reuters: Technology - Fri, 2014-12-05 12:21
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla - A U.S. spaceship designed to one day fly astronauts to Mars made a near-bullseye splashdown in the Pacific Ocean on Friday, wrapping up a flawless, unmanned debut test flight around Earth.






Categories: news

Corporations Misusing Our Data

Schneier on Security - Fri, 2014-12-05 07:45
In the Internet age, we have no choice but to entrust our data with private companies: e-mail providers, service providers, retailers, and so on. We realize that this data is at risk from hackers. But there's another risk as well: the employees of the companies who are holding our data for us. In the early years of Facebook, employees had...
Categories: security

Pages