news aggregator

RMIT boffins fast-track space junk search

The Register - Mon, 2015-01-05 16:47
Got five seconds? That's all you need to spot a flying tin can

Researchers at Australia s RMIT University, working with EOS Space Systems, reckon they can plot the trajectory of space junk with just two five-second samples of the target's trajectory.…

Categories: news

FCC Revamps Customer Complaint System

Slashdot - Mon, 2015-01-05 16:12
blottsie writes The FCC has heard your complaints, and it's finally going to make it easier to file more complaints. The Federal Communications Commission on Monday announced the launch of its Consumer Help Center, which according to a press release will feature a "streamlined, user-friendly complaint filing system," the "ability for consumers to monitor complaints, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week," and "faster delivery of complaints to service providers, enabling them to respond to consumers sooner."

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Top 5 Arch Linux Derivatives

Linux Today - Mon, 2015-01-05 16:00

MakeTechEasier: If you don’t like building from scratch, that’s fine too. There are many, many Arch Linux derivatives out there to choose from.

Categories: linux, news, open source

About 4King time: Panasonic finally reveals voice-control Firefox OS TVs

The Register - Mon, 2015-01-05 15:51
Plus full HD camcorders and home spycams

CES 2015 Panasonic today tore the wraps off Firefox OS-powered 4K TVs, high-def 4K camcorders, and home surveillance cameras, at CES in Las Vegas.…

Categories: news

How Long Will It Take Streaming To Dominate the Music Business?

Slashdot - Mon, 2015-01-05 15:51
journovampire writes with this story about the booming music streaming business. "Streaming is on course to make more money for the U.S. music business than downloads and physical sales combined within the next three years. The U.S. appears poised for streaming to become its most valuable music format in either 2016 or 2017, according to MBW forecasts – so long as you include SoundExchange royalties generated by digital radio platforms like Pandora alongside subscription and ad-supported platforms like Spotify. But in the other three biggest recorded music markets in the world – France, Germany and Japan – the public appears more hesitant to allow streaming to take over."

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Categories: news

Inside Amsterdam's Efforts To Become a Smart City

Slashdot - Mon, 2015-01-05 15:30
First time accepted submitter MollsEisley writes Throughout Amsterdam there are "Living Labs," or communities that act as petri dishes for ideas and initiatives to be tested before scaling them across the city. In IJburg, Amsterdam's youngest neighborhood, projects like free Wi-Fi and a new Fiber network, personalized television and transportation services, and a coworking space allow residents to experiment and test city projects to improve healthcare, environment, and energy programs in the city.

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Categories: news

2015: Open Source Has Won, But It Isn't Finished

Linux Today - Mon, 2015-01-05 15:00

ComputerWorldUK: After the wins of 2014, what's next?

Categories: linux, news, open source

NASA to launch microwave SPACE LASSO to probe Earth's wet spots

The Register - Mon, 2015-01-05 14:47
Water a great idea

Video At the end of the month, NASA will launch one of its most unusual satellites yet: a radar hurling a 19-foot-long (6-metre) mesh antenna around its head every four seconds.…

Categories: news

Writers Say They Feel Censored By Surveillance

Slashdot - Mon, 2015-01-05 14:45
schwit1 writes with news about the impact of government surveillance on authors and their work worldwide . A survey of writers around the world by the PEN American Center has found that a significant majority said they were deeply concerned with government surveillance, with many reporting that they have avoided, or have considered avoiding, controversial topics in their work or in personal communications as a result. The findings show that writers consider freedom of expression to be under significant threat around the world in democratic and nondemocratic countries. Some 75 percent of respondents in countries classified as "free," 84 percent in "partly free" countries, and 80 percent in countries that were "not free" said that they were "very" or "somewhat" worried about government surveillance in their countries. The survey, which will be released Monday, was conducted anonymously online in fall 2014 and yielded 772 responses from fiction and nonfiction writers and related professionals, including translators and editors, in 50 countries.

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Categories: news

Android Candy: Disney Everywhere, Even Android!

Linux Journal - Mon, 2015-01-05 14:06

As a father of three girls, I have piles and piles of Disney DVDs and Blu-rays. I occasionally look at the "Digital Copy" information and roll my eyes, because it requires some odd Windows DRM software or some other convoluted watching method that usually isn't possible or even interesting for me. more>>

Categories: linux, news, open source

In Daring Plan, Tomorrow SpaceX To Land a Rocket On Floating Platform

Slashdot - Mon, 2015-01-05 14:01
HughPickens.com writes "The cost of getting to orbit is exorbitant, because the rocket, with its multimillion-dollar engines, ends up as trash in the ocean after one launching, something Elon Musk likens to throwing away a 747 jet after a single transcontinental flight. That's why tomorrow morning at 620 am his company hopes to upend the economics of space travel in a daring plan by attempting to land the first stage of a Falcon 9 rocket intact on a floating platform, 300 feet long and 170 feet wide in the Atlantic Ocean. SpaceX has attempted similar maneuvers on three earlier Falcon 9 flights, and on the second and third attempts, the rocket slowed to a hover before splashing into the water. "We've been able to soft-land the rocket booster in the ocean twice so far," says Musk. "Unfortunately, it sort of sat there for several seconds, then tipped over and exploded. It's quite difficult to reuse at that point." After the booster falls away and the second stage continues pushing the payload to orbit, its engines will reignite to turn it around and guide it to a spot about 200 miles east of Jacksonville, Florida. Musk puts the chances of success at 50 percent or less but over the dozen or so flights scheduled for this year, "I think it's quite likely, 80 to 90 percent likely, that one of those flights will be able to land and refly." SpaceX will offer its own launch webcast on the company's website beginning at 6 a.m. If SpaceX's gamble succeeds, the company plans to reuse the rocket stage on a later flight. "Reusability is the critical breakthrough needed in rocketry to take things to the next level." SpaceX announced the plan in December.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Open source carries software-defined storage forward

Linux Today - Mon, 2015-01-05 14:00

 ZDnet: Software-defined storage will come into its own in 2015, and open-source software will carry it there.

Categories: linux, news, open source

Nest Will Now Work With Your Door Locks, Light Bulbs and More

Slashdot - Mon, 2015-01-05 13:35
An anonymous reader writes with news about 15 new brand partnerships Nest announced today. "When Google purchased Nest Labs – the maker of Internet-connected thermostats and smoke detectors – the search engine giant saw the potential to create a software platform for controlling the myriad everyday devices and gadgets in consumers' homes, a central hub for the so-called "Internet of things." This vision took a major step towards becoming reality Monday morning, when Nest announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas that 15 new partners were joining its "Works with Nest" developer program. Soon, everything from washing machines to light bulbs will be connected with the Nest platform."

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Categories: news

Interviews: Ask Alexander Stepanov and Daniel E. Rose a Question

Slashdot - Mon, 2015-01-05 13:15
An anonymous reader writes "Alexander Stepanov studied mathematics at Moscow State University and has been programming since 1972. His work on foundations of programming has been supported by GE, Brooklyn Polytechnic, AT&T, HP, SGI, and, since 2002, Adobe. In 1995 he received the Dr. Dobb's Journal Excellence in Programming Award for the design of the C++ Standard Template Library. Currently, he is the Senior Principal Engineer at A9.com. Daniel E. Roseis a programmer and research scientist who has held management positions at Apple, AltaVista, Xigo, Yahoo, and is the Chief Scientist for Search at A9.com. His research focuses on all aspects of search technology, ranging from low-level algorithms for index compression to human-computer interaction issues in web search. Rose led the team at Apple that created desktop search for the Macintosh. In addition to working together, the pair have recently written a book, From Mathematics to Generic Programming. Alexander and Daniel have agreed to answer any questions you may have about their book, their work, or programming in general. As usual, ask as many as you'd like, but please, one per post."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

3 Ways To Create A Persistent Bootable Xubuntu Live Linux USB Drive

Linux Today - Mon, 2015-01-05 13:00

 EveryDayLinuxUser: This guide shows 3 different methods for creating a persistent Xubuntu USB drive.

Categories: linux, news, open source

Tumblr Co-Founder: Apple's Software Is In a Nosedive

Slashdot - Mon, 2015-01-05 12:27
mrspoonsi writes Respected developer Marco Arment is worried about Apple's future. In a blog post, he writes, "Apple's hardware today is amazing — it has never been better. But the software quality has taken such a nosedive in the last few years that I'm deeply concerned for its future." Arment was CTO at Tumblr, before he left to start Instapaper. "Apple has completely lost the functional high ground," says Arment. "'It just works' was never completely true, but I don't think the list of qualifiers and asterisks has ever been longer." He blames Apple prioritizing marketing for the problems with Apple's software. Apple wants to have new software releases each year as a marketing hook, but the annual cycles of updating Apple's software are leading to too many bugs and problems, he says: I suspect the rapid decline of Apple's software is a sign that marketing has a bit too much power at Apple today: the marketing priority of having major new releases every year is clearly impossible for the engineering teams to keep up with while maintaining quality. Maybe it's an engineering problem, but I suspect not — I doubt that any cohesive engineering team could keep up with these demands and maintain significantly higher quality."

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Categories: news

End well: this won't. European Copyright Society wants one EU law to rule 'em all

The Register - Mon, 2015-01-05 12:02
Not as if members have hugely divergent IP traditions, right?

Copyright laws in every EU country should be the same, the European Copyright Society (ECS) has said.…

Categories: news

Fixing USB Autosuspend

Linux Today - Mon, 2015-01-05 12:00

 hamwave: The Linux kernel automatically suspends USB devices to save power.

Categories: linux, news, open source

Same-sex marriages to begin in Miami after stay lifted: court order

Reuters: Technology - Mon, 2015-01-05 11:51
MIAMI (Reuters) - A Florida judge ruled same-sex marriages could begin in Miami-Dade County on Monday, lifting a stay on her earlier decision that found the state's gay marriage ban unconstitutional.
Categories: news

Project Ryptide Drone Flies Life-Rings To Distressed Swimmers

Slashdot - Mon, 2015-01-05 11:46
Zothecula writes The speed that drones can be deployed makes them ideal for delivering items when time is of the essence. The Ambulance Drone and Defikopter, for example, are used for transporting defibrillators to those in need. Now, Project Ryptide plans to use drones to deliver life-rings to swimmers in distress. From the article: "The project, which is at pre-production prototype stage, was conceived by Bill Piedra, a part-time teacher at the King Low Heywood Thomas (KLHT) school in Stamford, Connecticut. Piedra began working on the design in January 2014 and then began developing it further with students at KLHT in September 2014. 'Ryptide was designed so that anyone can be a lifeguard,' Piedra tells Gizmag. 'We had the casual user in mind when we designed the basic model; someone that might take their drone to the beach, boating, a lake, or even ice skating. It could be useful in the case of someone falling through the ice while skating, for example.'"

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