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GM Names and Fires Engineers Involved In Faulty Ignition Switch

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 10:06
An anonymous reader writes 'Thirteen people have died because of faulty ignition switches in General Motors vehicles. The company has recalled 2.6 million cars, paid a $35 million fine, and set up a fund to compensate the victims. Now, an internal investigation into the incident has shown that the company was aware of the problem since 2002. 15 employees have been fired over what CEO Mary Barra calls "misconduct and incompetence." The report singles out Ray DeGiorgio, an engineer who allegedly approved a part that did not meet specifications and misled coworkers who were investigating complaints. "He actually changed the ignition switch to solve the problem in later model years of the Cobalt, but failed to document it, told no one, and claimed to remember nothing about the change." "There's no evidence anyone else knew the switch was out-of-spec at the time, the report says; neither did DeGiorgio tell anyone when issues with the part were brought to his attention multiple times. When one engineer specifically asked DeGiorgio in 2004 whether the switch met torque specifications, DeGiorgio didn't respond. Evidence the investigators gathered showed that he started two e-mails but never sent them. ... Instead, DeGiorgio was consumed by a problem in which cars with the switch were failing to start in cold weather, something the report says was "a personal embarrassment to DeGiorgio.'"'

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

GM Names and Fires Engineers Involved In Faulty Ignition Switch

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 10:06
An anonymous reader writes 'Thirteen people have died because of faulty ignition switches in General Motors vehicles. The company has recalled 2.6 million cars, paid a $35 million fine, and set up a fund to compensate the victims. Now, an internal investigation into the incident has shown that the company was aware of the problem since 2002. 15 employees have been fired over what CEO Mary Barra calls "misconduct and incompetence." The report singles out Ray DeGiorgio, an engineer who allegedly approved a part that did not meet specifications and misled coworkers who were investigating complaints. "He actually changed the ignition switch to solve the problem in later model years of the Cobalt, but failed to document it, told no one, and claimed to remember nothing about the change." "There's no evidence anyone else knew the switch was out-of-spec at the time, the report says; neither did DeGiorgio tell anyone when issues with the part were brought to his attention multiple times. When one engineer specifically asked DeGiorgio in 2004 whether the switch met torque specifications, DeGiorgio didn't respond. Evidence the investigators gathered showed that he started two e-mails but never sent them. ... Instead, DeGiorgio was consumed by a problem in which cars with the switch were failing to start in cold weather, something the report says was "a personal embarrassment to DeGiorgio.'"'

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

GM Names and Fires Engineers Involved In Faulty Ignition Switch

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 10:06
An anonymous reader writes "Thirteen people have died because of faulty ignition switches in General Motors vehicles. The company has recalled 2.6 million cars, paid a $35 million fine, and set up a fund to compensate the victims. Now, an internal investigation into the incident has shown that the company was aware of the problem since 2002. 15 employees have been fired over what CEO Mary Barra calls "misconduct and incompetence." The report singles out Ray DeGiorgio, an engineer who allegedly approved a part that did not meet specifications and misled coworkers who were investigating complaints. "He actually changed the ignition switch to solve the problem in later model years of the Cobalt, but failed to document it, told no one, and claimed to remember nothing about the change." "There's no evidence anyone else knew the switch was out-of-spec at the time, the report says; neither did DeGiorgio tell anyone when issues with the part were brought to his attention multiple times. When one engineer specifically asked DeGiorgio in 2004 whether the switch met torque specifications, DeGiorgio didn't respond. Evidence the investigators gathered showed that he started two e-mails but never sent them. ... Instead, DeGiorgio was consumed by a problem in which cars with the switch were failing to start in cold weather, something the report says was "a personal embarrassment to DeGiorgio.'""

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

GM Names and Fires Engineers Involved In Faulty Ignition Switch

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 10:06
An anonymous reader writes "Thirteen people have died because of faulty ignition switches in General Motors vehicles. The company has recalled 2.6 million cars, paid a $35 million fine, and set up a fund to compensate the victims. Now, an internal investigation into the incident has shown that the company was aware of the problem since 2002. 15 employees have been fired over what CEO Mary Barra calls "misconduct and incompetence." The report singles out Ray DeGiorgio, an engineer who allegedly approved a part that did not meet specifications and misled coworkers who were investigating complaints. "He actually changed the ignition switch to solve the problem in later model years of the Cobalt, but failed to document it, told no one, and claimed to remember nothing about the change." "There's no evidence anyone else knew the switch was out-of-spec at the time, the report says; neither did DeGiorgio tell anyone when issues with the part were brought to his attention multiple times. When one engineer specifically asked DeGiorgio in 2004 whether the switch met torque specifications, DeGiorgio didn't respond. Evidence the investigators gathered showed that he started two e-mails but never sent them. ... Instead, DeGiorgio was consumed by a problem in which cars with the switch were failing to start in cold weather, something the report says was "a personal embarrassment to DeGiorgio.'""

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

GM Names and Fires Engineers Involved In Faulty Ignition Switch

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 10:06
An anonymous reader writes "Thirteen people have died because of faulty ignition switches in General Motors vehicles. The company has recalled 2.6 million cars, paid a $35 million fine, and set up a fund to compensate the victims. Now, an internal investigation into the incident has shown that the company was aware of the problem since 2002. 15 employees have been fired over what CEO Mary Barra calls "misconduct and incompetence." The report singles out Ray DeGiorgio, an engineer who allegedly approved a part that did not meet specifications and misled coworkers who were investigating complaints. "He actually changed the ignition switch to solve the problem in later model years of the Cobalt, but failed to document it, told no one, and claimed to remember nothing about the change." "There's no evidence anyone else knew the switch was out-of-spec at the time, the report says; neither did DeGiorgio tell anyone when issues with the part were brought to his attention multiple times. When one engineer specifically asked DeGiorgio in 2004 whether the switch met torque specifications, DeGiorgio didn't respond. Evidence the investigators gathered showed that he started two e-mails but never sent them. ... Instead, DeGiorgio was consumed by a problem in which cars with the switch were failing to start in cold weather, something the report says was "a personal embarrassment to DeGiorgio.'""

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

The sought after Linux professional

Linux Today - Fri, 2014-06-06 10:00

opensource.com: There's no such thing as "just a Linux sysadmin," which is what makes Linux professionals so incredibly valuable.

Categories: linux, news, open source

Redmond is patching Windows 8 but NOT Windows 7, say security bods

The Register - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:56
New tool checks differences, could lead to 0-day bonanza

Microsoft has left Windows 7 exposed by only applying patches to its newest operating systems.…

Categories: news

Canon offers a cloud just for still photos, not anything else. Weird

The Register - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:33
If you have only a camera and a desktop computer, this is for YOU

Japanese camera and printer behemoth Canon has started up a cloud photo storage service called irista.…

Categories: news

Afghan election front-runner escapes assassination attempt

Reuters: Technology - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:29
KABUL (Reuters) - Abdullah Abdullah, front-runner in Afghanistan's presidential election, escaped assassination on Friday when two bombs blew up outside a hotel where he had just staged a rally, killing six people.






Categories: news

Facing barriers, Draghi will keep markets waiting for any more ECB action

Reuters: Technology - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:24
FRANKFURT (Reuters) - European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi has whetted markets' appetite for more ECB policy action but investors will have to wait some time before he uses the only real option he has left - a major asset-buying plan.
Categories: news

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:20
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:20
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:20
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:20
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:20
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:20
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:20
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Big risks seen in Putin's idea to beef up Gazprom

Reuters: Technology - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:08
MOSCOW (Reuters) - President Vladimir Putin's idea of a massive boost to Gazprom's share capital has taken bankers and the energy industry by surprise, with some fearing it could further strain Russia's sanctions-hit economy and undermine the rouble.
Categories: news

Build your own distro part two

Linux Today - Fri, 2014-06-06 09:00

LinuxUser: Discover the different methods available for creating your own customised distro and have everything working your way in no time

Categories: linux, news, open source

Fantastic fantasy four-way fling – and family-friendly fun

The Register - Fri, 2014-06-06 08:59
Just escaped a cave of dragons? This is what you've been missing

Game Theory I'm 300 pages into Brandon Sanderson's Words of Radiance from The Storm Light Archive and I have decided it’s the best fantasy book I've ever read. On Sunday nights I drag my eyes from the page to watch the fourth series of Game of Thrones – I’m all about fantasy at the moment, just call me Lucy Targaryen, Mother of Ferrets.…

Categories: news