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Congressmen Who Lobbied FCC Against Net Neutrality & Received Payoff

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 14:50
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica published an article Friday highlighting the results from research conducted by a money-in-politics watchdog regarding the 28 congressmen who sent a combined total of three letters to the FCC protesting against re-classifying the internet as a public utility. These 28 members of the U.S. House of Representatives 'received, on average, $26,832 from the "cable & satellite TV production & distribution" sector over a two-year period ending in December. According to the data, that's 2.3 times more than the House average of $11,651.' That's average. Actual amounts that the 28 received over a two year period ranged from $109,250 (Greg Walden, R-OR) to $0 (Nick Rahall, D-WV). Look at the list yourselves, and find your representative to determine how much legitimacy can be attributed to their stated concerns for the public."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Congressmen Who Lobbied FCC Against Net Neutrality & Received Payoff

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 14:50
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica published an article Friday highlighting the results from research conducted by a money-in-politics watchdog regarding the 28 congressmen who sent a combined total of three letters to the FCC protesting against re-classifying the internet as a public utility. These 28 members of the U.S. House of Representatives 'received, on average, $26,832 from the "cable & satellite TV production & distribution" sector over a two-year period ending in December. According to the data, that's 2.3 times more than the House average of $11,651.' That's average. Actual amounts that the 28 received over a two year period ranged from $109,250 (Greg Walden, R-OR) to $0 (Nick Rahall, D-WV). Look at the list yourselves, and find your representative to determine how much legitimacy can be attributed to their stated concerns for the public."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Congressmen Who Lobbied FCC Against Net Neutrality & Received Payoff

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 14:50
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica published an article Friday highlighting the results from research conducted by a money-in-politics watchdog regarding the 28 congressmen who sent a combined total of three letters to the FCC protesting against re-classifying the internet as a public utility. These 28 members of the U.S. House of Representatives 'received, on average, $26,832 from the "cable & satellite TV production & distribution" sector over a two-year period ending in December. According to the data, that's 2.3 times more than the House average of $11,651.' That's average. Actual amounts that the 28 received over a two year period ranged from $109,250 (Greg Walden, R-OR) to $0 (Nick Rahall, D-WV). Look at the list yourselves, and find your representative to determine how much legitimacy can be attributed to their stated concerns for the public."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Congressmen Who Lobbied FCC Against Net Neutrality & Received Payoff

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 14:50
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica published an article Friday highlighting the results from research conducted by a money-in-politics watchdog regarding the 28 congressmen who sent a combined total of three letters to the FCC protesting against re-classifying the internet as a public utility. These 28 members of the U.S. House of Representatives 'received, on average, $26,832 from the "cable & satellite TV production & distribution" sector over a two-year period ending in December. According to the data, that's 2.3 times more than the House average of $11,651.' That's average. Actual amounts that the 28 received over a two year period ranged from $109,250 (Greg Walden, R-OR) to $0 (Nick Rahall, D-WV). Look at the list yourselves, and find your representative to determine how much legitimacy can be attributed to their stated concerns for the public."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Congressmen Who Lobbied FCC Against Net Neutrality & Received Payoff

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 14:50
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica published an article Friday highlighting the results from research conducted by a money-in-politics watchdog regarding the 28 congressmen who sent a combined total of three letters to the FCC protesting against re-classifying the internet as a public utility. These 28 members of the U.S. House of Representatives 'received, on average, $26,832 from the "cable & satellite TV production & distribution" sector over a two-year period ending in December. According to the data, that's 2.3 times more than the House average of $11,651.' That's average. Actual amounts that the 28 received over a two year period ranged from $109,250 (Greg Walden, R-OR) to $0 (Nick Rahall, D-WV). Look at the list yourselves, and find your representative to determine how much legitimacy can be attributed to their stated concerns for the public."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Congressmen Who Lobbied FCC Against Net Neutrality & Received Payoff

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 14:50
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica published an article Friday highlighting the results from research conducted by a money-in-politics watchdog regarding the 28 congressmen who sent a combined total of three letters to the FCC protesting against re-classifying the internet as a public utility. These 28 members of the U.S. House of Representatives 'received, on average, $26,832 from the "cable & satellite TV production & distribution" sector over a two-year period ending in December. According to the data, that's 2.3 times more than the House average of $11,651.' That's average. Actual amounts that the 28 received over a two year period ranged from $109,250 (Greg Walden, R-OR) to $0 (Nick Rahall, D-WV). Look at the list yourselves, and find your representative to determine how much legitimacy can be attributed to their stated concerns for the public."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Congressmen Who Lobbied FCC Against Net Neutrality & Received Payoff

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 14:50
An anonymous reader writes "Ars Technica published an article Friday highlighting the results from research conducted by a money-in-politics watchdog regarding the 28 congressmen who sent a combined total of three letters to the FCC protesting against re-classifying the internet as a public utility. These 28 members of the U.S. House of Representatives 'received, on average, $26,832 from the "cable & satellite TV production & distribution" sector over a two-year period ending in December. According to the data, that's 2.3 times more than the House average of $11,651.' That's average. Actual amounts that the 28 received over a two year period ranged from $109,250 (Greg Walden, R-OR) to $0 (Nick Rahall, D-WV). Look at the list yourselves, and find your representative to determine how much legitimacy can be attributed to their stated concerns for the public."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Israel hints back-channel talks launched with Palestinians

Reuters: Technology - Sat, 2014-05-17 14:03
JERUSALEM (Reuters) - A senior member of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government hinted on Saturday that Israel was involved in back-channel contacts with Palestinian and Arab officials despite the collapse of U.S.-brokered peace negotiations last month.






Categories: news

Obama plans to pick San Antonio mayor for housing secretary: source

Reuters: Technology - Sat, 2014-05-17 13:57
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama plans to choose San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro as secretary of housing and urban development as part of a Cabinet reshuffle, a Democratic source said on Saturday.
Categories: news

Meet Canada's Goosebuster Drone

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 13:48
Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "Tyler LeBlanc reports that Ottawa has a problem — a goose problem. Every summer the wandering waterfowl return to the beaches that line the Ottawa River leaving high concentrations of geese poop on beaches and in shallow water, which can lead to outbreaks of infection in human populations, particularly children. In the past, the city has tried a number of different methods of ridding their beaches of the geese, but this year, they are going high-tech. Steve Wambolt, the founder of Aerial Perspective, modified a drone with some flashing lights and speakers and took to the skies. 'I took existing land-based anti-pest technology and put it on a helicopter,' says Wambolt. 'When I tested it at the beach a few days later it worked remarkably well.' Using pre-recorded predatory calls (video) from hawks, eagles, owls, ravens and even wolves, Wambolt stalks the beaches of Petrie Island in an attempt to scare the loitering geese away from the area for good."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

More than 20 dead, thousands evacuated in Bosnia, Serbia floods

Reuters: Technology - Sat, 2014-05-17 13:14
OBRENOVAC, Serbia (Reuters) - More than 20 people have been killed in the worst floods in more than a century in Serbia and Bosnia, authorities said on Saturday, with thousands evacuated from towns still under threat from rising rivers.






Categories: news

Hyundai recalling more than 140,000 Tucson crossover vehicles

Reuters: Technology - Sat, 2014-05-17 12:55
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Hyundai Motor Co is recalling more than 140,000 Tucson crossover utility vehicles because the air bag assembly may come loose from its mounting on the steering wheel, according to documents filed with U.S. auto safety regulators.
Categories: news

Separatists recapture their leader on the eve of peace talks in Ukraine

Reuters: Technology - Sat, 2014-05-17 12:53
KIEV (Reuters) - Pro-Russian separatist leader Valery Bolotov was detained by Ukrainian border guards on Saturday then freed by armed supporters in a firefight at the checkpoint, a Ukrainian spokesman said.






Categories: news

Robbery Suspect Tracked By GPS and Killed

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 12:46
New submitter Lew Lorton notes a NY Times story about a thief in New York City who was tracked and located using a GPS device inside a decoy pill bottle he had stolen (along with other pill bottles) from a pharmacy. When police confronted the thief, he raised a gun to shoot at an officer, and was killed "The decoy bottles were introduced last year by the police commissioner at the time, Raymond W. Kelly, who announced that the department would begin to stock pharmacy shelves with decoy bottles of painkillers containing GPS devices. The initiative was in response to a sharp increase of armed and often deadly pharmacy robberies across the state, frequently by people addicted to painkillers. ... The bottles are designed to be weighted and to rattle when shaken, so a thief does not initially realize they do not contain pills. Each of the decoy bottles sits atop a special base, and when the bottle is lifted from the base, it begins to emit a tracking signal."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Turkish mine disaster town under lockdown as death toll rises to 301

Reuters: Technology - Sat, 2014-05-17 12:26
SOMA, Turkey (Reuters) - Turkish police put the mining town of Soma on virtual lockdown on Saturday, setting up checkpoints and detaining dozens of people to enforce a ban on protests as rescue efforts following the country's worst industrial disaster ended.






Categories: news

Le Biniou 3.20

Freshmeat - Sat, 2014-05-17 12:26
Le Biniou works with music, voice, ambient sounds, and whatever acoustic source you chose. When you run Le Biniou, it gives a revolutionary rendering of the sound you are playing. You can entirely manage the sequences and chose your own series of pictures from the default library, your colour scales, and the kind of alteration you want to apply, or you can let Le Biniou's artificial intelligence run on its own. Forget the old visualizations you are familiar with and discover a new multidimensional (spatial and chromatic) way of comprehending music and sounds for artistic, recreational, or didactic purposes.

Release Notes: This release adds various build/packaging enhancements.

Tags: vj software, sound, chaos

Licenses: GPLv2

Categories: open source

India's Modi gets hero's welcome as he brings new era to New Delhi

Reuters: Technology - Sat, 2014-05-17 12:06
NEW DELHI (Reuters) - Hundreds of Indians thronged the leafy streets of New Delhi on Saturday to greet Narendra Modi's triumphant march into the capital after he decimated the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty and the ruling Congress party in the biggest election victory the country has seen in 30 years.






Categories: news

New PostgreSQL guns for NoSQL market

Linux Today - Sat, 2014-05-17 12:00

 ComputerWorld: Embracing the widely used JSON data-exchange format, the new version of the PostgreSQL open-source database takes aim at the growing NoSQL market of nonrelational data stores, notably the popular MongoDB.

Categories: linux, news, open source

Ctalk 0.0.97 2014-05-17

Freshmeat - Sat, 2014-05-17 11:45
Ctalk adds classes, methods, operator overloading, inheritance, and complex object expressions to otherwise standard C programs. Programs can use only a few Ctalk objects and methods in an otherwise standard C program, but the language can be used to write entire programs also. Ctalk works on most if not all of the systems that support GCC, the GNU C compiler. The package includes the language, class and run-time libraries, example programs, tutorial, and language reference.

Release Notes: This release adds support for drawing XPM graphics in X11 windows, the ctxlogo demonstration program, updated argument checking at runtime, an implementation of the "continue" keyword within argument blocks, updates to the ctpp preprocessor, and many minor bugfixes and performance improvements.

Tags: Software Development, Interpreters, C Library, object oriented, language, C language

Licenses: GPL

Categories: open source

Understanding an AI's Timescale

Slashdot - Sat, 2014-05-17 11:40
An anonymous reader writes "It's a common trope in sci-fi that when AIs become complex enough to have some form of consciousness, humans will be able to communicate with them through speech. But the rate at which we transmit and analyze data is infinitesimal compared to how fast a computer can do it. Would they even want to bother? Jeff Atwood takes a look at how a computer's timescale breaks down, and relates it to human timeframes. It's interesting to note the huge variance in latency. If we consider one CPU cycle to take 1 second, then a sending a ping across the U.S. would take the equivalent of 4 years. A simple conversation could take the equivalent of thousands of years. Would any consciousness be able to deal with such a relative delay?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news