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Red Hat: 2014:1244-01: bind97: Moderate Advisory

LinuxSecurity.com - Mon, 2014-09-15 21:18
LinuxSecurity.com: Updated bind97 packages that fix one security issue and one bug are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]
Categories: linux, news, security

Red Hat: 2014:1243-01: automake: Low Advisory

LinuxSecurity.com - Mon, 2014-09-15 21:08
LinuxSecurity.com: An updated automake package that fixes one security issue is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Low security [More...]
Categories: linux, news, security

Red Hat: 2014:1194-01: conga: Moderate Advisory

LinuxSecurity.com - Mon, 2014-09-15 21:08
LinuxSecurity.com: Updated conga packages that fix multiple security issues and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]
Categories: linux, news, security

Schizophrenia Is Not a Single Disease

Slashdot - Mon, 2014-09-15 21:05
An anonymous reader writes: New research from Washington University has found that the condition known as schizophrenia is not just a single disease, but instead a collection of eight different disorders. For years, researchers struggled to understand the genetic basis of schizophrenia. This new method was able to isolate and identify the different conditions (each with its own symptoms) currently classified under the same heading (abstract, full text). "In some patients with hallucinations or delusions, for example, the researchers matched distinct genetic features to patients' symptoms, demonstrating that specific genetic variations interacted to create a 95 percent certainty of schizophrenia. In another group, they found that disorganized speech and behavior were specifically associated with a set of DNA variations that carried a 100 percent risk of schizophrenia." According to one of the study's authors, "By identifying groups of genetic variations and matching them to symptoms in individual patients, it soon may be possible to target treatments to specific pathways that cause problems."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Bank IT bod accused of stealing $40 MEEELLION from employer

The Register - Mon, 2014-09-15 21:02
Turns out there may actually be a Nigerian 'prince' out there with cash

If you get an email from a hapless Nigerian prince who needs a hand shifting a few million dollars, the message will no doubt wing its way into your spam folder.…

Categories: news

WordPress Resets 100,000 Passwords After Google Account Leak

Linux Today - Mon, 2014-09-15 21:00

eWEEK: As it turns out, although Google itself didn't see much impact, the exposure from the 5 million accounts is broader than just Google.

Categories: linux, news, open source

Massachusetts shoots down car dealers' Tesla-busting sueball

The Register - Mon, 2014-09-15 20:29
Court will allow flash motor maker to sell direct to punters

A court in Massachusetts, US, has ruled in favor of Tesla in a case that could have barred the company from selling its electric car in the state.…

Categories: news

Chinese 'Sogou Explorer' browser sends URLs to parts unknown

The Register - Mon, 2014-09-15 19:58
APNIC sniffs the digital exhaust and finds 1 in 400 'net users have stalkers

A Chinese-language cloud-based browser seems to be snooping on its users, according to research conducted by the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre's (APNIC's) Geoff Huston, George Michaelson and Byron Ellacot.…

Categories: news

Alibaba: Just kidding about that $21bn IPO ... we actually want $25bn

The Register - Mon, 2014-09-15 19:37
Chinese gumble flogger ups goal for market debut

Chinese web bazaar Alibaba has raised the goal for its upcoming stock market debut in the US.…

Categories: news

Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

Slashdot - Mon, 2014-09-15 19:10
An anonymous reader writes: A few years ago, author Neal Stephenson argued that sci-fi had forgotten how to inspire people to do great things. Indeed, much of recent science fiction has been pessimistic and skeptical, focusing on all the ways our inventions could go wrong, and how hostile the universe is to humankind. Now, a group of scientists, engineers, and authors (including Stephenson himself) is trying to change that. Arizona State University recently launched Project Hieroglyph, a hub for ideas that will influence science fiction to be more optimistic and accurate, and to focus on the great things humanity is capable of doing. For example, in the development of a short story, Stephenson wanted to know if it's possible to build a tower that's 20 kilometers tall. Keith Hjelmsad, an expert in structural stability and computational mechanics, wrote a detailed response about the challenge involved in building such a tower. Other authors are contributing questions as well, and researchers are chiming in with fascinating, science-based replies. Roboticist Srikanth Saripalli makes this interesting point: "If the government has to decide what to fund and what not to fund, they are going to get their ideas and decisions mostly from science fiction rather than what's being published in technical papers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

Slashdot - Mon, 2014-09-15 19:10
An anonymous reader writes: A few years ago, author Neal Stephenson argued that sci-fi had forgotten how to inspire people to do great things. Indeed, much of recent science fiction has been pessimistic and skeptical, focusing on all the ways our inventions could go wrong, and how hostile the universe is to humankind. Now, a group of scientists, engineers, and authors (including Stephenson himself) is trying to change that. Arizona State University recently launched Project Hieroglyph, a hub for ideas that will influence science fiction to be more optimistic and accurate, and to focus on the great things humanity is capable of doing. For example, in the development of a short story, Stephenson wanted to know if it's possible to build a tower that's 20 kilometers tall. Keith Hjelmsad, an expert in structural stability and computational mechanics, wrote a detailed response about the challenge involved in building such a tower. Other authors are contributing questions as well, and researchers are chiming in with fascinating, science-based replies. Roboticist Srikanth Saripalli makes this interesting point: "If the government has to decide what to fund and what not to fund, they are going to get their ideas and decisions mostly from science fiction rather than what's being published in technical papers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

Slashdot - Mon, 2014-09-15 19:10
An anonymous reader writes: A few years ago, author Neal Stephenson argued that sci-fi had forgotten how to inspire people to do great things. Indeed, much of recent science fiction has been pessimistic and skeptical, focusing on all the ways our inventions could go wrong, and how hostile the universe is to humankind. Now, a group of scientists, engineers, and authors (including Stephenson himself) is trying to change that. Arizona State University recently launched Project Hieroglyph, a hub for ideas that will influence science fiction to be more optimistic and accurate, and to focus on the great things humanity is capable of doing. For example, in the development of a short story, Stephenson wanted to know if it's possible to build a tower that's 20 kilometers tall. Keith Hjelmsad, an expert in structural stability and computational mechanics, wrote a detailed response about the challenge involved in building such a tower. Other authors are contributing questions as well, and researchers are chiming in with fascinating, science-based replies. Roboticist Srikanth Saripalli makes this interesting point: "If the government has to decide what to fund and what not to fund, they are going to get their ideas and decisions mostly from science fiction rather than what's being published in technical papers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

Slashdot - Mon, 2014-09-15 19:10
An anonymous reader writes: A few years ago, author Neal Stephenson argued that sci-fi had forgotten how to inspire people to do great things. Indeed, much of recent science fiction has been pessimistic and skeptical, focusing on all the ways our inventions could go wrong, and how hostile the universe is to humankind. Now, a group of scientists, engineers, and authors (including Stephenson himself) is trying to change that. Arizona State University recently launched Project Hieroglyph, a hub for ideas that will influence science fiction to be more optimistic and accurate, and to focus on the great things humanity is capable of doing. For example, in the development of a short story, Stephenson wanted to know if it's possible to build a tower that's 20 kilometers tall. Keith Hjelmsad, an expert in structural stability and computational mechanics, wrote a detailed response about the challenge involved in building such a tower. Other authors are contributing questions as well, and researchers are chiming in with fascinating, science-based replies. Roboticist Srikanth Saripalli makes this interesting point: "If the government has to decide what to fund and what not to fund, they are going to get their ideas and decisions mostly from science fiction rather than what's being published in technical papers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

Slashdot - Mon, 2014-09-15 19:10
An anonymous reader writes: A few years ago, author Neal Stephenson argued that sci-fi had forgotten how to inspire people to do great things. Indeed, much of recent science fiction has been pessimistic and skeptical, focusing on all the ways our inventions could go wrong, and how hostile the universe is to humankind. Now, a group of scientists, engineers, and authors (including Stephenson himself) is trying to change that. Arizona State University recently launched Project Hieroglyph, a hub for ideas that will influence science fiction to be more optimistic and accurate, and to focus on the great things humanity is capable of doing. For example, in the development of a short story, Stephenson wanted to know if it's possible to build a tower that's 20 kilometers tall. Keith Hjelmsad, an expert in structural stability and computational mechanics, wrote a detailed response about the challenge involved in building such a tower. Other authors are contributing questions as well, and researchers are chiming in with fascinating, science-based replies. Roboticist Srikanth Saripalli makes this interesting point: "If the government has to decide what to fund and what not to fund, they are going to get their ideas and decisions mostly from science fiction rather than what's being published in technical papers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

Slashdot - Mon, 2014-09-15 19:10
An anonymous reader writes: A few years ago, author Neal Stephenson argued that sci-fi had forgotten how to inspire people to do great things. Indeed, much of recent science fiction has been pessimistic and skeptical, focusing on all the ways our inventions could go wrong, and how hostile the universe is to humankind. Now, a group of scientists, engineers, and authors (including Stephenson himself) is trying to change that. Arizona State University recently launched Project Hieroglyph, a hub for ideas that will influence science fiction to be more optimistic and accurate, and to focus on the great things humanity is capable of doing. For example, in the development of a short story, Stephenson wanted to know if it's possible to build a tower that's 20 kilometers tall. Keith Hjelmsad, an expert in structural stability and computational mechanics, wrote a detailed response about the challenge involved in building such a tower. Other authors are contributing questions as well, and researchers are chiming in with fascinating, science-based replies. Roboticist Srikanth Saripalli makes this interesting point: "If the government has to decide what to fund and what not to fund, they are going to get their ideas and decisions mostly from science fiction rather than what's being published in technical papers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Apple iPhone 6 pre-orders hit record 4 million on first day

Reuters: Technology - Mon, 2014-09-15 18:48
(Reuters) - Apple Inc said many customers will need to wait until next month for their new iPhones after a record 4 million first-day pre-orders were logged, double the number for the iPhone 5 two years ago.
Categories: news

Alibaba boosts IPO as demand strengthens

Reuters: Technology - Mon, 2014-09-15 18:46
HONG KONG/NEW YORK (Reuters) - Alibaba Group Holding Ltd [IPO-BABA.N] raised the price range on its initial public offering to $66 to $68 on Monday, reflecting strong demand from investors for the year's most anticipated debut and potentially the world's largest-ever IPO.






Categories: news

Iran supreme leader spurns U.S. overture to fight Islamic State

Reuters: Technology - Mon, 2014-09-15 18:43
PARIS/DUBAI (Reuters) - Iran's supreme leader said on Monday he had personally rejected an offer from the United States for talks to fight Islamic State, an apparent blow to Washington's efforts to build a military coalition to fight militants in both Iraq and Syria.






Categories: news

Funding Tech For Government, Instead of Tech For Industry

Slashdot - Mon, 2014-09-15 18:27
An anonymous reader writes: If you're a creative engineer looking to build a product, you're probably going to end up starting your own business or joining an established one. That's where ideas get funding, and that's where products make a difference (not to mention money). Unfortunately, it also siphons a lot of the tech-related talent away from government (and by extension, everybody else), who could really benefit from this creative brilliance. That's why investor Ron Bouganim just started a $23 million fund for investment in tech companies that develop ideas for the U.S. government. Not only is he hoping to transfer some of the $74 billion spent annually by the government on technology to more efficient targets, but also to change the perception that the best tech comes from giant, entrenched government contractors.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: news

Tough luck, Zuck! Man who claimed to own half of Facebook has fraud trial delayed six months

The Register - Mon, 2014-09-15 18:16
Judge grants his new lawyer time to peruse the evidence

The man accused of trying to cheat Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg out of half of the social network has had his fraud trial delayed by six months so he can take time to go over his case with his new lawyer.…

Categories: news